TECHNIQUE

Propofol Anaesthesia in Waterfowl (Disease Investigation & Control - Treatment and Care)

Summary Information
Type of technique Health & Management / Disease Investigation & Control / Treatment & Care / Techniques:
Synonyms and Keywords Propofol Induction

See also:

Description N.B. Information given in this page is to be used in conjunction with the relevant sections on Anaesthesia and Chemical Restraint within "Treatment and/or Control".

Before using any anaesthetic agent or combination of agents the manufacturer's data sheet on the agent or agents concerned should be consulted, taking particular note of any contra-indications and operator warnings.

(J3.136.w2, B37.x.w1, P8.3.w1).

  • 10mg/kg intravenously (catheter into medial metatarsal vein) over one minute, with additional bolus injection of 1-2mg if required to allow intubation.
  • 1-2 mg boluses for maintenance.
  • Smooth, rapid induction and recovery.

(J1.36.w1).

Appropriate Use (?)
  • Particularly useful in field situations due to rapid recovery (J1.36.w1).
  • For anaesthetic induction where mask induction by isoflurane is not appropriate (B37.x.w1).
  • Rapid recovery allows prompt return to water.
Notes
  • Shake ampoule thoroughly before use.
  • Do not mix with other agents or infusion fluids prior to administration.
  • Unused portion of vial should be discarded.

(B90)

Complications/ Limitations / Risk
  • Period of action considered by some authors to be too short for practical use in birds (B11.9.w20, B14).
  • May be narrow safety margin (B14).
Equipment / Chemicals required and Suppliers Propofol is available in the UK as Rapinovet (Schering-Plough Animal Health), a white aqueous isotonic emulsion containing 10mg/ml propofol (B90).
Expertise level / Ease of Use Procedure should only be undertaken by an individual with appropriate clinical training and practical experience; this would usually be a veterinarian or someone with advanced veterinary technician training.

N.B. Whenever an anaesthetic is undertaken, the anaesthetist must be familiar with emergency protocols. Consideration must be given as to the availability of equipment required to monitor the anaesthetic plane of the animal being anaesthetized and any equipment/drugs required for revival. It is advisable to calculate the doses of any revival agents which may be required in an emergency BEFORE COMMENCING the anaesthetic (V.w6).

Cost/ Availability Relatively expensive.
Legal and Ethical Considerations In some countries there may be legislation restricting the use of this type of technique to licensed veterinarians. For example in the UK: "The Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 (Section 19) provides, subject to a number of exceptions, that only registered members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons may practice veterinary surgery."(see: LCofC1 - RCVS Guide to Professional Conduct 2000 - Treatment of Animals by Non-Veterinary Surgeons).).

Use of Drugs (Medication):

  • Many drugs are not registered for use in particular bird species and care should be taken in their use, with proper regard for possible toxic effects. Consideration should be give to relevant legislation regarding the use of drugs.
  • In the UK, guidelines regarding the use of drugs are set out in the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Guide to Professional Conduct 2000: (see: LCofC1 - RCVS Guide to Professional Conduct 2000 - Choice of Medicinal Products).

Before using any anaesthetic agent or combination of agents the manufacturer's data sheet on the agent or agents concerned should be consulted, taking particular note of any contra-indications and operator warnings.

Author Debra Bourne
Referee  
References J1.36.w1, J3.136.w2, B11.9.w20, B14, B37.x.w1, B90, P8.3.w1, V.w6

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