DISEASE LINK PAGE

Pasteurellosis in Birds

Summary Information
Diseases / List of Bacterial Diseases / Disease description:

This disease page is currently predominantly used in Wildpro to link different data types and demonstrate inter-relationships. Whilst basic information is available, It does not contain detailed information.

Alternative Names
  • Pasteurella multocida infection
  • Pasteurella infection
  • See also: Avian cholera
Disease Agents
  • Pasteurella multocida
  • Pasteurella spp.
  • (D48)

Further information on Disease Agents has only been incorporated for agents recorded in species for which a full Wildpro "Health and Management" module has been completed (i.e. for which a comprehensive literature review has been undertaken). Only those agents with further information available are linked below:

Infectious Agent(s)
Non-infectious Agent(s) --
Physical Agent(s) -- Indirect / Secondary
General Description In Britain pasteurellosis is seen as a sporadic infection in birds following injury by predators such as cats.

In North America, large outbreaks of disease caused by the same organism occur. This is known as Avian cholera.

Clinical signs:

  • Acute or chronic
  • Lethargy, weakness.
  • Fluffed-up feathers
  • Eyes closed or part closed.
  • (D48)

Pathology:

  • Localised pus formation at bite or scratch site (most common in chronic cases)
  • Septicaemic lesions: 
  • Liver - areas of necrosis and inflammation
  • Spleen - areas of necrosis and inflammation
  • (D48)
Further Information Commonly seen in birds following attacks by cats or other predators; may cause the deaths of as many as 60% of birds bitten by cats and rescued alive (J3.109.w1, D48)

Diagnosis:

  • Suspect in birds bitten or scratched by a cat or dog. (D48)

Treatment:

  • Antibiotics.
  • Treatment is most likely to be successful if started soon after the injury has occurred.
  • (D48)
Techniques linked to this disease
Host taxa groups /species

Further information on Host species has only been incorporated for species groups for which a full Wildpro "Health and Management" module has been completed (i.e. for which a comprehensive literature review has been undertaken).

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