Kingdoms / Animalia / Craniata / Aves / Anseriformes / Anatidae / Amazonetta / Species
< >  Amazonetta brasiliensis - Brazilian Teal (Click photographs/illustrations: full picture & further details)
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INFORMATION AVAILABLE

GENERAL & REFERENCES

EXTERNAL APPEARANCES

REPRODUCTION

BEHAVIOUR

NATURAL DIET

RANGE & HABITAT

CONSERVATION

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(Waterfowl)

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General and References

Alternative Names (Synonyms)

Brazilian duck
Amazonasente (German)
Canard amazonette (French)
Sarcelle du Brésil (French)
Pato Brasileno (Spanish)
Cereta brazileña (Spanish)
Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis Lesser Brazilian teal
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira Greater Brazilian teal
Anas brasiliensis

Names for newly-hatched

Duckling, downy.

Names for non-breeding males or other colour-phases

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References

Species Author

Debra Bourne

Major References

B1, B3, B6, B8, B19, B25, B26

Aviculture references:
B7, B11.33.w1, B29, B31, B94, B96, B97, B108,
D1, D8

Other References

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TAXA Group (where information has been collated for an entire group on a modular basis)

Parent Group

Specific Needs Group referenced in Management Techniques

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Aviculture Information

Notes

General information:
  • Perching Ducks and "geese" are generally happier maintained fully-flighted if possible, for example in an aviary for the smaller species, or under flight netting.
  • While the larger species in this group are hardy, the smaller species may be more delicate and require winter shelter. These species eat a high proportion of vegetable matter and appreciate a grazing area. Most of these species are hole-nesters.
  • Many of these species are sociable outside the breeding season, although Cairina moschata - Muscovy duck, Cairina scutulata - White-winged duck, Pteronetta hartlaubii - Hartlaub's duck and Plectropterus gambensis - Spur-winged goose can all be aggressive and require separate enclosures.

(B7, B11.33.w1, B94, D1)

Species-specific information:

  • Brazilian teal are reasonably but they are susceptible to frost-bitten feet on icy ground (Frostbite): a dry, frost- and draught-proof shelter with straw-covered ground or a large open water area should be available in winter and they may need to be confined in shelter at night. These birds are suitable for large and small mixed collections, also for aviaries, but may be slightly aggressive while breeding and a separate pen might therefore be suggested at this time. Feed with waterfowl pellets and grain plus extra animal protein and greenfood (dandelion leaves, duckweed).
  • These ducks are considered easy or fairly easy to breed. Both raised and ground-level boxes may be used for laying, also natural vegetation cover. Laying may begin end of April and continue to July (B31); occur mainly April to May (B29), or July to August (B108) . These ducks are good brooders, the ducklings are robust and easy to rear; they quickly start to feed when hand-reared.
  • Drakes commonly mate with other species, particularly Anas spp.

(B29, B31, B94, B96, B97, B108, D1).

Aviornis UK Ringing Scheme recommended average ring size: H 8.0mm (L 11.0mm for Amazonetta. brasiliensis ipecutira Greater Brazilian teal)(D8).

Management Techniques

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External Appearance (Morphology)

Measurement & Weight

Length 35-40cm (B1); Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis 37-39cm, Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira 45cm (B26).
Adult weight General Amazonetta brasiliensis brasilensis 350-480g; Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira 580-600g (B1)
Male Amazonetta brasiliensis brasilensis 380-480g (B3);14.4-16.9 ounces (B8)
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira 600g (B3); mean 1.3 lbs. (B8)
Female Amazonetta brasiliensis brazilensis 350-390g (B3); mean 12.3-13.7 ounces (B8)
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira 580g (B3); mean 1.3 lbs. (B8).
Newly-hatched weight --
Growth rate --

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Head

Adult Bill Male Bright red (B3, B6, B8, B25)
Variations (If present) Female:- Grey. (B3, B6, B8, B25)
Eyes (Iris) Male Brown (B25)
Variations(If present) --
Juvenile Bill Grey (B3, B6, 25, B26).
Eyes (Iris) Brown (B3, B6,B25)

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Legs

Adult Male Bright red to orange-red (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26)
Variations (If present) Female:- dull orange-red (B6, B25)
Juvenile Dull orange-red (B6, B25).

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Plumage

Adult Male Head and neck: sides grey-buff, dark brown crown, to black hind neck, face brown from bill to just behind eyes. Breast rufous brown shading to abdomen and flanks grey-brown with dark brown spots, largest and darkest on flanks. Upperparts dark brown, tail dark brown/black, tail-coverts light brown. Wing green-glossed black, greater coverts and secondaries bright metallic green, with black bar then broad white tips on secondaries.
(B3, B6, B8, B25, B26).
Variations (If present) Female:- head dark brown to below eyes, with greyish sides, white spots near bill and above eyes, and white throat. (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26)

Pale and dark colour-phases in both sub-species: face patch white or dark grey (B1, B8, B25)

Juvenile Similar to female but duller (B1, B3, B6, B25, B26).

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Newly-hatched Characteristics

General: upperparts dark brown with pale markings on sides and wings; underparts yellow, dark stripe through eye to nape (B6, B26)
Bill: dusky yellow (B6)
Feet: dusky pink (B6).

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Reproduction

Reproductive Season

Time of year Varies with geographical location (B1). June to December (B8) June to July northern Argentina, November to December Paraguay, September to October Guyana (B25)
No. of Clutches Possibly more than one (from captive breeding records) (B25).

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Nest placement and structure

Mound of vegetation, sometimes floating, in rushes or sedge hummocks surrounded by water, also occasionally in tree hollows, abandoned nests of other birds in trees, possibly cliff sides. (B1, B3, B8, B25, B26)

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Egg clutches

No. of Eggs Average --
Range 6-8 (B1, B8)
Egg Description Pale cream or yellow-tinged white (B3, B8); size: 49x35mm; weight: 31g (B3).

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Incubation

About 25 days (B1); mean 26 days (B8).

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Hatching

Synchronous.

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Fledging

50-60 days (B8).

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Sexual Maturity

Males --
Females --

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Behaviour

Feeding Behaviour

Adults Dabble in shallow water near shore or bank (B8, B25)
Newly-hatched Catch flies and mosquitoes (B8).

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Parental Behaviour

Nest-building Solitary nests.
Incubation By female (B3, B8)
Newly-hatched Tended by both parents (B3, B6, B8, B26)
Juveniles

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Social Behaviour

Intra-specific Family groups may form small flocks, sometimes of 10-20 birds (B3, B8)
Inter-specific Sometimes loaf with other birds along shoreline (B8, B25).

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Sexual Behaviour

Strong, durable and possibly permanent pair bonds (B3, B8, B25).

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Predation in Wild

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Activity Patterns

Perch on branches over water (B8, B25, B26)
Circadian --

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Natural Diet

Adults

Seeds, fruits, roots, insects (B1, B8).

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Newly-hatched

Insectivorous (B8)

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Range and Habitat

Distribution and Movement (Migration etc.)

Normal

Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis Eastern Columbia, northern and eastern Venezuela, Guyana, northern and central Brazil
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira eastern Bolivia and southern Brazil to northern Argentina and Uruguay.

Movements: Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis sedentary, but southern Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira birds move north in winters, into the range of Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis

(B1, B8, B19, B25)

Occasional and Accidental

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Introduced

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Habitat

Inland, pools, streams, marshes and small lakes in dense woodland, also flooded fields, rarely in brackish or saline waters (coastal lagoons and mangroves) (B1, B8, B19, B25, B26)

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Conservation

Intraspecific variation

Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis from Eastern Columbia, northern and eastern Venezuela, Guyana, northern and central Brazil is smaller and non-migratory;
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutira from eastern Bolivia and southern Brazil to northern Argentina and Uruguay is larger and southernmost birds migrate north in the winter.
(B1, B3, B6, B8, B25, B26)

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Conservation Status

Wild Population -
(Importance)
Not globally threatened. widely distributed and common, adaptable to habitat change (B1, B8).
CITES listing --
Red-data book listing --
Threats --

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Captive Populations

Quite common in collections but much hybridisation between the sub-species (B8).

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Trade

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