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< > Pteronetta hartlaubii - Hartlaub's duck (Click photographs/illustrations: full picture & further details)
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INFORMATION AVAILABLE

GENERAL & REFERENCES

EXTERNAL APPEARANCES

REPRODUCTION

BEHAVIOUR

NATURAL DIET

RANGE & HABITAT

CONSERVATION

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General and References

Alternative Names (Synonyms)

Hartlaub duck
Hartlaub’s goose
Hartlaub’s teal
Hartlaubsente (German)
Hartlaubente (German)
Canard de Hartlaub (French)
Ptéronette de Hartlaub (French)
Pato de Hartlaub (Spanish)
Pteronetta hartlaubi
Cairina hartlaubi
(Pteronetta hartlaubi albifrons - Eastern Hartlaub's duck)

Names for newly-hatched

Duckling, downy.

Names for non-breeding males or other colour-phases

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References

Species Author

Debra Bourne

Major References

B1, B3, B6, B8, B25, B26.

Aviculture references:
B7, B11.33.w1, B29, B30, B94
D1, D8

Other References

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TAXA Group (where information has been collated for an entire group on a modular basis)

Parent Group

Specific Needs Group referenced in Management Techniques

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Aviculture Information

Notes

General information:
  • Perching Ducks and "geese" are generally happier maintained fully-flighted if possible, for example in an aviary for the smaller species, or under flight netting.
  • While the larger species in this group are hardy, the smaller species may be more delicate and require winter shelter. These species eat a high proportion of vegetable matter and appreciate a grazing area. Most of these species are hole-nesters.
  • Many of these species are sociable outside the breeding season, although Cairina moschata - Muscovy duck, Cairina scutulata - White-winged duck, Pteronetta hartlaubii - Hartlaub's duck and Plectropterus gambensis - Spur-winged goose can all be aggressive and require separate enclosures.

(B7, B11.33.w1, B94, D1)

Species-specific information:

  • Hartlaub's ducks may be aggressive and require a separate enclosure, particularly when breeding. They are reasonably hardy but shelter should be available in prolonged cold winter weather.
  • These ducks have been considered difficult to breed; they have been bred sporadically rather than regularly. A raised or ground level nest box may be used, or they may nest in very dense vegetation. Eggs laid mainly end of April to June.

(B11.33.w1, B29, B30, B94, D1).

Aviornis UK Ringing Scheme recommended average ring size: L 11.0mm (D8).

Management Techniques

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External Appearance (Morphology)

Measurement & Weight

Length 22-23 inches, 56-58cm (B1, B3).
Adult weight General 800-940g (B1, B3)
Male Mean 2.1 lbs. (B8); mean 976g (B25).
Female Mean 1.7 lbs. (B8); mean 788g (B25).
Newly-hatched weight --
Growth rate --

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Head

Adult Bill Male Black with grey to yellow or pinkish near tip but black nail. Base sometimes swollen in breeding season. (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26)
Variations (If present) Female:- no swelling of bill base (B3, B25)
Eyes (Iris) Male Reddish-brown (B6, B25)
Variations(If present) Female:- brown (B6); reddish-brown (B25)
Juvenile Bill Black with grey to yellow or pinkish near tip but black nail. (B25)
Eyes (Iris) Reddish-brown (B25)

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Legs

Adult Male Dark yellow-tinged brown (B6, B25)
Variations (If present) --
Juvenile Dark yellow-tinged brown (B6, B25)

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Plumage

Adult Male Head and upper neck black with variable white on forehead, sometimes spreading over crown. Neck, breast, upperparts and underparts rich chestnut brown. Tail, rump and upper wing olive-brown, upperwing coverts blue, visible on side when wing folded. (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26).
Variations (If present) Female:- Slightly duller. Less or no white on head. (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26)
Juvenile Similar to adults but duller. Underparts have pale feather edges. (B3, B6, B25, B26)

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Newly-hatched Characteristics

General: Upperparts brown with black cap and yellow markings on wings, sides of back and rump, underparts yellow, including face and throat with black stripe through eye.
Bill: Black
Feet: Black
(B6, B7,B8, B26)

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Reproduction

Reproductive Season

Time of year No wild nests found: presume in rainy season as ducklings seen August to November (B1, B8, B25).
No. of Clutches --

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Nest placement and structure

Probably in tree hollows (from behaviour in captivity), with down (B1, B3, B7, B8, B25, B26)

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Egg clutches

No. of Eggs Average 9 (B8)
Range 8-12 (B1, 26); 7-12 (B8)
Egg Description Creamy (B8); Size 58 x 42mm (B3); weight 51g (B3).

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Incubation

30-32 days (B1, B8)

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Hatching

Synchronous.

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Fledging

56-60 days, perhaps up to 100 days (B8); about 8 weeks (B1)

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Sexual Maturity

Males 1 year old (B1)
Females 1 year old (B1)

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Behaviour

Feeding Behaviour

Adults Forage along streams and pools B6, B8)
Newly-hatched --

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Parental Behaviour

Nest-building --
Incubation By female (B3, B26).
Newly-hatched Tended and defended by both parents (B3, B7, B8)
Juveniles

May be driven away by male once fledged (B3).

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Social Behaviour

Intra-specific Usually found as pairs, sometimes in small flocks during moult (B3, B8, B25).
Inter-specific --

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Sexual Behaviour

Strong, probably life-long pair bonds (B8)

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Predation in Wild

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Activity Patterns

Perch on logs and branches of large trees (B3, B6, B8, B25, B26).
Circadian Feed mainly in the evening. (B3, B8, B25, B26)

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Natural Diet

Adults

Mainly aquatic invertebrates: aquatic insect larvae (Hexapoda), molluscs (Mollusca), crustaceans (Crustacea), arachnids (Arachnida). Also small seeds, and roots (B1, B8, B26).

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Newly-hatched

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Range and Habitat

Distribution and Movement (Migration etc.)

Normal

West central (equatorial) Africa. Sierra Leone, southern Guinea, Liberia eastward to southern Cameroon, Central African Republic, southern Sudan, north and north-east Zaire. Southward to north-eastern Angola and southern Zaire. Non-migratory. (B1, B19, B19-Suppl., B25, B26).

Occasional and Accidental

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Introduced

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Habitat

Rain forest and wooded savannahs. Forested streams, marshes and pools with heavy edge vegetation (B1, B3, B6, B8, B25, B26).

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Conservation

Intraspecific variation

Birds with more white on heads have sometimes been regarded as a separate sub-species: Pteronetta hartlaubi albifrons - Eastern Hartlaub's duck. B1, B8, B25

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Conservation Status

Wild Population -
(Importance)

Not globally threatened (B1), but may be considered near-threatened (B8).

CITES listing CITES III in Ghana (B1).
Red-data book listing --
Threats Loss of forest habitat (B8).

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Captive Populations

Uncommon in collections (B8).

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Trade

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