Kingdoms / Animalia / Craniata / Aves / Anseriformes / Anatidae / Anas / Species
< >  Anas hottentota - Hottentot teal (Click photographs/illustrations: full picture & further details)
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INFORMATION AVAILABLE

GENERAL & REFERENCES

EXTERNAL APPEARANCES

REPRODUCTION

BEHAVIOUR

NATURAL DIET

RANGE & HABITAT

CONSERVATION

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General and References

Alternative Names (Synonyms)

Hottentottenente (German)
Sarcelle hottentote (French)
Cerceta hotentote (Spanish)
Anas punctata
Punanetta hottentota

Names for newly-hatched

Duckling, downy.

Names for non-breeding males or other colour-phases

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References

Species Author

Debra Bourne

Major References

B1, B3, B5, B8, B19, B25, B26.

Other References

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TAXA Group (where information has been collated for an entire group on a modular basis)

Parent Group

Specific Needs Group referenced in Management Techniques

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Aviculture information

Notes

  • Generally hardy and easy to manage. Sunny, sheltered enclosures suggested, with winter shelter; warmer winter quarters may be required in cold climates. Feed as other dabbling ducks: graint, pellets, greenfood, grass, bread, appreciate duckweed and floating aquatic vegetation.
  • Require a quiet secluded pen for breeding, with no competition; plenty of ground cover should be provided for nesting as well as both ground level and elevated nest boxes. If kept in the open, eggs may be laid in summer, e.g. July (B31), or earlier e.g. April to May (B29). May be parent or broody reared (B96), although hand-rearing has been recommended, as the ducklings require much warmth (B31).
  • Hybrids reported with Anas versicolor - Silver teal and and Aix sponsa - Wood duck.

(B29, B31, B96, B97)

Management Techniques

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External Appearance (Morphology)

Measurement & Weight

Length 12-14 inches, 30-35cm (B3); 30-36cm (B1).
Adult weight General 224-253g (B3); 216-282g (B1); 7.9-8.9 ounces (B8).
Male --
Female --
Newly-hatched weight --
Growth rate --

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Head

Adult Bill Male Blue with black dorsal (culmen) line (B3, B5, B8, B25, B26)
Variations (If present) --
Eyes (Iris) Male Brown (B5, B25).
Variations(If present) --
Juvenile Bill Blue with black dorsal (culmen) line, duller than in adults (B25).
Eyes (Iris) Brown (B5, B25).

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Legs

Adult Male Dark blue-grey (B5, B25).
Variations (If present) --
Juvenile Dark blue-grey (B5, B25).

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Plumage

Adult Male Dorsal head from eye upward, and hind neck black-brown, ventral head, sides and fore-neck buff with dusky patch on sides of upper neck. Breast and underparts buff with dark brown spots, largest on fore flanks; rear flanks plain buff. Rump blackish, tail-coverts and hind abdomen/ventral region vermiculated buff and blackish. Upperparts dark brown with greyish edges to feathers. Wing black-brown with faint green-blue gloss, secondaries metallic green, black subterminal band, broad white tips (B3, B5, B8, B25).
Variations (If present) Female:- duller; crown browner, patch on neck less defined, scapulars shorter, ventral region not vermiculated, secondaries browner (B1, B3, B25).
Juvenile Duller than female (B1, B3, B25).

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Newly-hatched Characteristics

General: Upperparts sepia brown, underparts pale buff (B1, B5).
Bill: Grey (B5).
Feet: Grey (B5).

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Reproduction

Reproductive Season

Time of year Geographical variation; may be most of year when water levels suitable; mainly January-April in South Africa, June-October in Kenya (B1, B25).
No. of Clutches Probably re-nest if brood fails (B3).

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Nest placement and structure

Nest on ground, hidden in dense waterside vegetation, cup-shape, sometimes covered, constructed from reeds and grass, with dense down lining (B1, B3, B8, B25, B26).

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Egg clutches

No. of Eggs Average 7 (B3).
Range 6-9 (B1, B8); 6-8 (B3).
Egg Description Cream, light brown or yellow-buff (B3, B8); size: 43 x 33 mm; weight: 25g (B3).

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Incubation

24-27 days (B1, B8); 25-27 days (B3).

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Hatching

Synchronous.

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Fledging

45-55 days (B8).

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Sexual Maturity

Males Presumed one year old (Anas standard).
Females Presumed one year old (Anas standard).

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Behaviour

Feeding Behaviour

Adults Dabble on surface while swimming and wading and from shore, head-dip and up-end in shallows (B1, B3, B25).
Newly-hatched --

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Parental Behaviour

Nest-building Solitary or in loose groups, built by female (B1, B8).
Incubation By female; male remains nearby (B3, B8).
Newly-hatched Tended by female, but males sometimes accompany brood (B8).
Juveniles

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Social Behaviour

Intra-specific Usually found in pairs or small groups, with larger groups (up to 400 birds) sometimes forming outside the breeding season (B5, B8, B25).
Inter-specific Freely mix with other Dabbling Ducks, particularly Anas erythrorhyncha - Red-billed ducks (B8, B25).

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Sexual Behaviour

Monogamous pair bonds form before breeding season, but may also be long-term, with male sometimes accompanying female and ducklings (B8, B25).

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Predation in Wild

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Activity Patterns

Loaf during the day in small groups on shore and in marsh vegetation (B8, B25).
Circadian Feed most actively in early morning and evening, but also forage at night (B3, B8, B25).

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Natural Diet

Adults

Aquatic plants (seeds, fruits, roots, green parts); also aquatic invertebrates (molluscs, crustaceans, insects and their larvae) (B1, B3).

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Newly-hatched

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Range and Habitat

Distribution and Movement (Migration etc.)

Normal

Tropical eastern Africa: Ethiopia to Cape Province, westward to northern Botswana and Namibia, and Madagascar (B1, B19).

Occasional and Accidental

Vagrant to Angola (B25).

Introduced

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Habitat

Freshwater swamps, marshes, pools, streams, shallow small lakes with abundant floating and fringe vegetation (B1, B3, B8, B19, B25).

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Conservation

Intraspecific variation

Madagascan population previously separated as Anas punctata (= hottentota) delacouri, but no longer recognised as separate sub-species (B5, B25).

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Conservation Status

Wild Population -
(Importance)

Not globally threatened, fairly widespread and locally numerous (B1, B8).

CITES listing --
Red-data book listing --
Threats --

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Captive Populations

Popular in collections (B8).

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Trade

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